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SOCIAL COMMUNICATION

Some children with autism may not be eager to communicate. They may not
be ready to learn things that other children learn naturally and therefore they
may not pick up language in the same way. Some may find it hard to make
sense of the things that happen around them.


Many children/young people with autism find trying to make sense of words
very confusing. Also, they may find it hard to understand all the non-verbal
parts of language that are used in daily communication: body language,
gestures, tone of voice, facial expressions. This may make it hard for them
to learn what is expected of them, and to recognise when someone is happy
or upset and what that means.


HERE ARE SOME COMMON EXAMPLES OF DIFFERENCES
WITH SOCIAL COMMUNICATION:

  • Some may echo words or phrases that other people say (either straight away, or later).
  • Some may take your words literally rather than understand the meaning you intended: ‘The teacher told the class to get into a circle so my son found a circle on the hall floor and went and stood in it.’
  • Some may speak in a flat tone of voice or speak too loudly or quietly.
  • Some may talk at length about something with no awareness of how the listener is feeling.
  • Some may not understand jokes.


 

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